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Europe

EU integration greatly influences policy-making at the national level, and the EU itself is a major actor on the world economic stage. Most of the conditions governing the economic and business environment for European companies and consumers - especially in respect of the financial markets - are decided at the European level. For this reason, Deutsche Bank Research analyses and appraises the latest developments in the EU and EMU. European banks and financial markets are a major focus in this regard.

183 (181-183)
June 25, 2008
Region:
European banks have become considerably more international over the past few years, in terms of both the structure of their revenues and of their shareholders. In this context particular emphasis has been placed on strengthening the European business outside the home market, with the home market share in total revenues falling as a result – at the 20 largest European banks e.g. by 4 percentage points since 2001 to less than half. By contrast, as much as one-quarter of total revenues came from the rest of Europe in 2007 (2001: 18%). [more]
181
April 22, 2008
Region:
Recent market turmoil and its consequences will negatively impact the earnings of European banks for a considerable time. This reverses a long period of improvements in profitability and efficiency. But: the current environment should not distract from the trends that have favourably shaped the structure of the industry for the last 10 years and will continue to do so: consolidation, internationalisation, convergence and increasing specialisation. In this study, we consider to what extent these trends are going to further shape the banking sector in the foreseeable future. [more]
182
June 16, 2006
Region:
Neither theory nor empirical observations can justify an interventionist industrial policy. Under the euphemism of economic patriotism, a policy based mainly on protectionist measures and state support will ultimately harm the competitiveness of affected industries. Such an approach threatens the viability of the single European market. A more promising alternative would be an economic policy that offers growth-enhancing framework conditions to create an attractive environment for domestic firms and foreign investors alike. [more]
183
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