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Markus Jäger

See more on "Macroeconomics"
9 Documents
April 13, 2016
1
A number of factors, including the decline in commodity prices, sizeable corporate foreign-currency debt, a strengthening dollar and the prospect of higher US interest rates, are weighing on the economic and financial outlook in the emerging markets (EM). The relative lack of reform combined with a weakening of some of the structural factors that underpin growth has raised concern about the medium-term outlook in many, but not all EM. [more]
October 27, 2015
2
Dependency ratio bottomed out in most advanced and most of the larger emerging economies sometime during the past 10-20 years. The dependency ratio is the ratio of people younger than 15 or older than 64 (so-called dependents) to those aged 15-64 (working-age population). Even China’s dependency ratio hit its sweet spot in 2010 and will rise rapidly over the coming decades. [more]
September 25, 2015
3
Continental drift is slow, takes place almost imperceptibly and ends up having dramatic effects in the long run. In this, it is very similar to demographic change. Let us begin with a few facts. The world’s population is set to grow from 7.3 bn today to more than 9.7 bn by 2050. By comparison, the world’s population was a mere 2.5 bn in 1950. The regional (continental) demographic balance has been shifting for quite some time. In 1950, four of the ten largest countries were European (Germany, Italy, USSR, UK). Today, only Russia, ironically the country with the most adverse demographics, ranks among the top-10. In 1950, the big European four made up 10% of the world’s population. This figure has dropped to 5% today and will continue to decline for the foreseeable future. The populations of Africa and Asia will continue to increase significantly – and dramatically so in Africa – over the next few decades (chart). Admittedly, the aggregate increase hides significant intra-regional differences (e.g. East versus South Asia). [more]
July 11, 2011
4
State-led economic development, if successfully implemented, is appropriate during the early “catch up” phase of economic growth. However, as growth becomes more dependent on indigenous innovation and hence a dynamic private sector, a shift to more market-led rather than state-directed development becomes necessary. This also applies to the banking sector. Subject to proper regulation, banking systems that rely on private-sector banks and market-led credit allocation will eventually tend to generate superior economic outcomes. That said, we are unlikely to see a significant reduction in public-sector bank ownership in the BRIC countries anytime soon, nor, for that matter, a tangible increase in foreign ownership. [more]
September 24, 2010
5
BRIC FX reserve accumulation continues (apace). As far as the BRICs are concerned, FX reserve accumulation is increasingly difficult to justify in terms of “risk insurance“: all four BRIC governments are net foreign (currency) creditors. Even if private-sector debt is included, national balance sheets look strong as far as solvency and liquidity are concerned. The performance of the BRICs throughout the crisis has also demonstrated their resilience, if not in terms of growth, at least in terms of financial stability. [more]
July 16, 2010
6
Following the creation of EMU, some observers predicted that the euro would emerge as the world’s major reserve currency. More recently, eurozone travails and rapidly rising US indebtedness have re-ignited the debate about alternative reserve currencies (incl. SDRs). Among the possible medium-term contenders for “top currency” status are the yuan and the euro. Neither the UK nor Switzerland, nor Japan, have or will have the necessary economic and financial size for their currencies to become the world’s dominant reserve currency. ... [more]
November 27, 2009
7
Brazil’s considerable improvement in economic fundamentals allowed the economy not only to recover quickly from the global financial crisis but also to put the country on a higher medium-term growth trajectory. According to our revised medium-term forecasts, medium-term GDP growth is likely to average 4.25% p.a., sustained by solid domestic demand growth. Based on these trends and against the background of lower interest rates and continued financial deepening, the domestic financial sector is set to thrive in the coming years. The 2010 presidential elections may bring about a slight shift in economic policy but economic stability is likely to be preserved. [more]
May 30, 2006
8
Brazil has made substantial progress towards greater economic stability. A combination of greater macro-stability, increased investment and openness, and gradual economic reform will lead to higher medium-term economic growth. The natural resources sector stands to benefit disproportionately from the on-going structural changes in the world economy. Strong Chinese demand will provide Brazil with a great opportunity to increase exports and growth. High-tech niches where Brazil has achieved a competitive advantage will also benefit. If domestic structural reform continues and macroeconomic stability is maintained, the financial sector will be another "winner". [more]
January 12, 2005
9
The political and economic impact of EU convergence will be unambiguously positive for Turkey, as it will benefit from continued EU-supervised reforms, increased economic stability and higher foreign investment flows. The banking sector in particular stands to benefit from enhanced stability and higher economic growth, and is likely to experience increased consolidation and foreign participation. This study is to depict plausible scenarios for the Turkish economy in the medium to long term, rather than predict at what point in time accession will actually take place. [more]
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