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The House View : Don’t dismiss inflation

April 25, 2017
Analyst:
Politics remain a key focus for markets, but the latest developments in Europe are positive. In France, the first round of the presidential election ruled out the least market-friendly ‎outcome, and although eurosceptic Marine Le Pen is in the run-off as expected, polls suggest reformist Macron should win. The snap election called in Britain for June is a material positive game-changer for Brexit negotiations. Beyond politics, focus has been on fading conviction in so-called Trump trades – higher inflation expectations and interest rates and buoyant risk assets – following speed bumps on the US domestic agenda and increased geopolitical tension. But with global macro momentum solid – though off recent highs – and global growth expected to pick-up next year and approach 4% in 2018, do not dismiss inflation risks, especially in the US. Indeed the macro backdrop comforts the view that we are past peak central bank easing. The Fed will likely raise rates twice more this year and announce the start of the unwind of its balance sheet. The ECB is on track to announce a taper of its quantitative easing programme later this year, but the tone at the April meeting should still be quite cautious. We have revisited our currency views. The snap UK election caused us to increase our sterling forecast but did not alter our medium-term bearish stance. We still expect the euro to break parity but the sequencing of the ECB's tightening policies is key: a shift toward rate rises rather than a withdrawal of quantitative easing would be bullish for the euro. In rates, we expect bond yields to climb beyond near-term election risk. In credit we expect the low default environment to persist. We see valid counters to the consensus view that European equities should outperform US equities. David Folkerts-Landau, Group Chief Economist Key pages this month: P6 French election updateP7 UK snap electionP10 Fading Trump tradesP11 Don’t dismiss inflationP19 Updated views on sterling and euro [more]

More documents contained in "The House View"

3 Documents
September 18, 2017
1
Unlike the last few years, this summer was relatively quiet. As markets look ahead to the rest of the year, the key theme will continue to be the major central banks’ tentative progress toward removing monetary accommodation. Investors have so far not priced in this outlook. Since the prospects for growth across all the major countries is better than it has been for some time it remains a puzzle why there hasn't been a greater sell-off in bond markets. [more]
July 25, 2017
2
As markets enter into the summer lull, it is useful to take a step back. The global economy is in better shape than it has been in several years. This has allowed other central banks to follow the Fed and gradually start their exit journey, a process that is a historic challenge given the unprecedented level of monetary accommodation. But with inflation still below target, a key part of the normalisation puzzle is still missing. [more]
June 28, 2017
3
Global investors have recently been forced to sift through mixed signals from macro data and markets. Chief among these discordant messages is the apparent dichotomy between softer inflation, lower yields and flatter curves, and falling oil prices on the one hand, and still solid global growth and firm risk sentiment on the other hand. [more]