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The House View : Taking a step back

July 25, 2017
As markets enter into the summer lull, it is useful to take a step back. The global economy is in better shape than it has been in several years. This has allowed other central banks to follow the Fed and gradually start their exit journey, a process that is a historic challenge given the unprecedented level of monetary accommodation. But with inflation still below target, a key part of the normalisation puzzle is still missing. Although labour market tightness has not yet fed to wages, and hence to inflation, we expect it will. Core inflation should move higher over the medium-term in the US and Europe, supporting further monetary tightening and a normalisation of yield curves. While no policy change is expected by the Fed on 26-July, an announcement to begin phasing out its balance sheet reinvestment is likely in September and we expect another rate hike in December. As for the ECB, rate hikes are still far off, and we expect the central bank to announce another QE extension and tapering in October. Our global macro outlook is little changed this year. We expect growth to rebound from the slowest pace post-crisis in 2016, though relative to consensus we are more positive on the US and more bearish on Japan. In China, we continue to expect a gradual deceleration, but see upside risks to growth in the second half of the year. We are generally constructive on risk assets, expecting material upside to US equities in the next 18 months and positive but more balanced performance in EM. There are signs the dollar has peaked, but we do not expect a material devaluation yet. We are more positive on the euro, seeing upside versus the dollar and sterling. We expect yield curves to normalise gradually, but there is risk of a more sudden upward shift, depending on the path of core inflation. David Folkerts-Landau, Group Chief Economist Key pages this month: P6 Global economy in a better place P8 Central banks overview P11 Current low inflation regime vs. 1960s and 1980s P17 Signs of dollar top You can access a two-page update of Deutsche Bank Research's views on global macro, monetary policy and markets, as well as some of the key themes driving them, at any time by downloading The House View Snapshot from: houseview.research.db.com. [more]

More documents about "International"

156 (61-72)
March 14, 2018
65
Robust, broad-based global expansion. Synchronised growth across regions and economies, in many cases at above-trend levels. We expect global growth to accelerate to +3.9% this year, marginally above 2017, as fundamentals remain supportive. We expect the US and eurozone to continue growing above potential, but do not anticipate any further acceleration. In China, we expect growth to slow, and are more worried about inflation and financial risks than consensus. 2018 should mark the peak of the current cyclical expansion; growth should decelerate from 2019. [more]
March 7, 2018
66
Inflation data over the past year – and especially over the past week – have highlighted a critical point. Fluctuations in inflation rates for items that are typically insensitive to the busi-ness cycle — which we refer to as acyclical, such as health care and apparel — can drive the overall inflation trajectory and lead to regime shifts in the market’s inflation narrative. The plunge in wireless telephone services prices last March, followed by a string of downside surprises to other acyclical items, spawned a narrative that structural disinflationary forces would prevent inflation from rising. In the same way, recent stronger inflation data led by acyclical items may have revived the narrative that the Phillips curve is, in fact, alive and well and that risks are tilted toward inflation overshooting the Fed’s target. [more]
March 1, 2018
67
In the fourth part of our series on the impact of rising yields, we discuss the rising incidence of zombie firms in recent years. Bottom-up data of some 3,000 companies in the FTSE All World index show that the percentage of zombie firms has more than tripled to 2.0% of firms in 2016 from 0.6% in 1996. Such firms are defined as those with an interest coverage ratio under 1x for 2 consecutive years and a price to sales ratio under 3x. That matters because zombie firms are linked to fading business dynamism and because years of low interest rates should have led to fewer such firms, not more. There are early signs we are at a turning point, however. The numbers for 2017, with two-thirds of firms reporting, suggest that zombie firm incidence declined sharply last year. If this proves to be a real trend, it may give central banks confidence that continuing to raise rates and pull away from unconventional monetary policy will have some advantages. [more]
February 19, 2018
69
Opinions differ when it comes to bitcoin. Discussions are triggered largely by bitcoin’s spectacular price increasess and are not very informed or nuanced. In this paper we focus on several standard claims, which we will put into context and, if necessary, rectify. This will hopefully help our readers to familiarise themselves with the topic. [more]
February 15, 2018
Analyst:
70
The rise of bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies and the decline in cash payments are the background for a new concept: digital cash issued by central banks. An old academic debate about who creates money and how is resurfacing, but what about the user’s perspective? Why would we use crypto euros? Such digital cash would compete against bank deposits, physical cash and private cryptocurrencies to win over consumers in the areas of payments and savings. [more]
February 9, 2018
71
Opinions differ when it comes to bitcoin. Discussions are triggered largely by bitcoin’s spectacular price increasess and are not very informed or nuanced. In this paper we focus on several standard claims, which we will put into context and, if necessary, rectify. This will hopefully help our readers to familiarise themselves with the topic. [more]
February 7, 2018
72
After a stellar 2017 and an even stronger January, risk assets have undergone a sharp pullback in the last week. Initially triggered by higher rates as markets repriced inflation expectations higher, the episode evolved into a technical spout of volatility exacerbated by programmatic strategies. The pullback is healthy, after a highly unusual stretch of market tranquility. [more]
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