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The impact of tax systems on economic growth in Europe: An overview

October 5, 2012
Region:
Analyst:
Since the financial crisis, the countries of Europe have been faced with the difficult challenge of consolidating their budgets while at the same time promoting economic growth. One approach is a growth-conducive tax system, which keeps distorting effects of taxation on the growth factors – labour, capital and technological progress – as small as possible. Tax reforms carried out in the EU to date are steps in the right direction. Increasing economic policy coordination in Europe offers the chance to implement further structural reforms. [more]

More documents about "Europe"

167 (145-156)
November 14, 2012
Region:
145
Since the start of 2011 the financial and sovereign debt crises have forced roughly half the governments in the euro area to accept a premature end to their term of office. So far, the elections in the crisis countries have established the conservative camp as the clear winner at the polls. The established major parties continue to dominate the political system in many countries. Nevertheless, the electoral successes of right-wing populist and newly established left-wing factions may hamper the formation of properly functioning governments in future. If the economic outlook for the young generation does not improve, this trend could continue. [more]
August 24, 2012
Region:
146
We assess the economic outlook for the Western Balkan region, including Croatia, Serbia, Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Macedonia, and Montenegro. Each country in the region is on the road to EU accession, though they are at very different stages of the process. The most advanced, Croatia, is set to become the EU’s 28th member towards the middle of next year. For the rest, it could be a long road given the economic and political challenges that they face, and also a sense of enlargement fatigue among some existing member states. [more]
July 27, 2012
150
Since 2006 the European Union has increasingly been looking to sign deep and comprehensive free trade agreements with emerging markets. In the meantime it has also been turning its attention to some industrialised nations. A trade agreement with South Korea has already come into effect. Although the EU is pinning great hopes on India and a number of ASEAN states, it is also keen to conclude similar agreements with Mercosur, Canada, Ukraine and virtually all of the Southern Mediterranean countries. It is even considering Japan and the United States as potential partners. If the European Union's bilateral free trade strategy were fully implemented by the end of this decade, it would give a moderate boost to trade, welfare, growth and employment in the EU and would often provide a much stronger stimulus in the partner countries concerned. This free trade strategy is also highly ambitious in terms of its diplomatic objectives because issues that have so far received insufficient attention – such as trade in services, technical trade barriers and foreign direct investment – are to be better regulated. Whether the EU – currently the world's largest trading bloc – is ultimately successful with this strategy will in many cases be decided by domestic politics in the partner countries. The fundamental question of whether a deep bilateral strategy should perhaps be complemented by a parallel multilateral approach as a matter of considerable urgency will be especially pertinent in transatlantic relations. However, there is also a risk of tensions within the international system. [more]
May 2, 2012
Region:
151
Deposits are the most important source of funding for European banks, providing about 60% of the total. At the same time, private-sector deposits tend to be less volatile than other funding instruments. The importance of deposits is set to increase even further in the medium term because of new regulatory requirements and higher levels of risk aversion at banks. Boosting deposit volumes could enable moderate growth in bank assets and thus also an increase in lending to the private sector over the coming years. However, this would require that households hold a larger share of their savings in the form of deposits and invest a smaller proportion in insurance policies. [more]
May 2, 2012
Region:
152
Europe is adopting a new approach: economic policy coordination in the EU and the eurozone has undergone fundamental reform over the last two years. Now it is conducted via three pillars that address general economic policy, fiscal policy and macroeconomic imbalances. However, disruption is still caused by exemptions, conflicting objectives and time inconsistencies. The new rule book will only be able gain a good reputation going forward if it is applied rigorously. The pressure of the capital markets will remain a key driver of reform in this regard. [more]
April 5, 2012
Region:
153
For the first time in at least a decade, all major revenue components at the 20 largest European banks declined simultaneously. Apart from trading income (-24%), the decrease was modest (interest income -0.5%, fees & commissions -1%) yet the looming challenge for banks’ business models has finally become crystal clear: there is no obvious driver for future growth. [more]
November 30, 2011
Region:
154
Migration can be an effective way of reducing geographical imbalances on the labour markets. Together with politicians and the larger society, companies have a key role to play in integrating migrant workers. It is also in the interest of companies to make good use of the international pool of qualified labor. With 20% of the population being either immigrants themselves (10%) or second-generation immigrants (another 10% according to the EU Commission) – both in Germany and France – the costs of not fully integrating this potential are high, both for business and society. [more]
November 15, 2011
Region:
155
The world economic crisis has seriously weakened potential economic growth in many industrialised countries for the coming years. And new regulatory requirements in the financial sector are likely to deal it a further blow. This has made economic policy measures to stimulate economic growth in the wake of structural reform an absolutely essential complement to macroeconomic measures, especially in the big industrial nations. Even at a time when the scope has narrowed for fiscal policy, this still holds true. It is precisely in periods of consolidation that structural reforms are vital to sustained success. [more]
August 2, 2011
Region:
156
Europe on the way to becoming a transfer union? The euro rescue packages - and the ECB’s involvement in the crisis - are reputed to be the forerunners of a transfer union between the euro countries. However, for the time being these are mainly government guarantees, the failure of which cannot be taken for granted. The EU is even further away from systematic financial equalisation of the euro countries. Nevertheless, continuing macroeconomic tensions could increase the need for transfers - and further inflame political tensions. [more]
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