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The House View : Don’t dismiss inflation

April 25, 2017
Analyst:
Politics remain a key focus for markets, but the latest developments in Europe are positive. In France, the first round of the presidential election ruled out the least market-friendly ‎outcome, and although eurosceptic Marine Le Pen is in the run-off as expected, polls suggest reformist Macron should win. The snap election called in Britain for June is a material positive game-changer for Brexit negotiations. Beyond politics, focus has been on fading conviction in so-called Trump trades – higher inflation expectations and interest rates and buoyant risk assets – following speed bumps on the US domestic agenda and increased geopolitical tension. But with global macro momentum solid – though off recent highs – and global growth expected to pick-up next year and approach 4% in 2018, do not dismiss inflation risks, especially in the US. Indeed the macro backdrop comforts the view that we are past peak central bank easing. The Fed will likely raise rates twice more this year and announce the start of the unwind of its balance sheet. The ECB is on track to announce a taper of its quantitative easing programme later this year, but the tone at the April meeting should still be quite cautious. We have revisited our currency views. The snap UK election caused us to increase our sterling forecast but did not alter our medium-term bearish stance. We still expect the euro to break parity but the sequencing of the ECB's tightening policies is key: a shift toward rate rises rather than a withdrawal of quantitative easing would be bullish for the euro. In rates, we expect bond yields to climb beyond near-term election risk. In credit we expect the low default environment to persist. We see valid counters to the consensus view that European equities should outperform US equities. David Folkerts-Landau, Group Chief Economist Key pages this month: P6 French election updateP7 UK snap electionP10 Fading Trump tradesP11 Don’t dismiss inflationP19 Updated views on sterling and euro [more]

More documents about "International"

182 (25-36)
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27
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December 3, 2019
Analyst:
28
The past year and a half has seen an impressive slide in the global economy. Global GDP growth is expected to have ebbed to its lowest rate since the great recession this year, with some regions nearing recession and others increasingly fearing it. The primary factor is the strongly depressing effect on global trade and investment that has resulted from sharp increases in economic policy uncertainty associated with both trade policy conflicts and Brexit. [more]
November 20, 2019
Analyst:
30
Trading volumes in foreign exchange instruments have increased significantly across the board in 2019 compared to the last global FX survey three years ago. Surprisingly, the pivotal role of London as the main trading location was reconfirmed, despite fears around the impact of Brexit. Yet a general move to central clearing might challenge this after the UK leaves the EU. [more]
November 20, 2019
Analyst:
31
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September 23, 2019
34
Jim Reid, Global Head of Thematic Research & Credit Research, Deutsche Bank Research has just published his annual Long-Term Asset Return Study. This year's focus is on the History and Future of Debt. The report also have all the usual long-term returns data for dozens of countries across different asset classes tracked back over more than a century for many series. [more]
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