Banking, Financial Markets and Regulation
Like the regulatory framework, the structure of the international financial markets influences the development of financial service providers and economies. Scenarios for the future development of the global financial market, and the related opportunities and risks, are a major part of the work of Deutsche Bank Research.
Talking point
Payments in the euro area: Are they stagnating? – No!
In 2014, for the first time, the number of cashless payments in the euro area did not grow – according to ECB figures. The transaction volume remained flat at 68 bn payments. However, this is due to an overhaul of the statistical methodology which caused breaks in many of the series. Corrected for this, there was actually a strong development of the market: cashless payments grew by about 7% yoy or almost 5 bn transactions. This growth rate is even at the upper end of growth in recent years. [more]
Global financial markets
Promoting investment and growth: The role of development banks in Europe
The financial and economic crisis brought development banks back in the spotlight. They are seen as part of the economic policy toolkit for overcoming cyclical and structural difficulties in economies, complementing financial systems by improving their functioning and bolstering economic resilience. Interest in development banking to promote growth and boost investment has increased especially in Europe of late. Given the current economic environment and changes in Europe’s banking and financial markets, development banks are bound to continue playing an important role in the coming years. Rather than crisis relief, their focus is shifting (back) to supporting structural change in economies. Here, they can play a useful complementary role, focusing on areas of market failure but risks lie with potential “overburdening” of development banks and setting expectations too high for what they can achieve. [more]
EU Monitor
Capital Markets Union: An ambitious goal, but few quick wins
The creation of a European Capital Markets Union (CMU) aims to establishing a single market for capital to complement bank financing. In this paper, we make a quantitative assessment of the European stock, bond and securitisation markets to look at the CMU’s potential. Our results reveal that liquidity and IPO trends in European stock markets are similar to those in the US. However, market integration has slowed down in recent years, which the CMU could counter by harmonising company, securities and insolvency laws. European corporate bond markets have become a notable alternative to bank lending but their investor base remains restricted, which the CMU should address. The securitisation market in Europe has performed well throughout the crises and its revival is a sine qua non for lending to regain traction, especially to SMEs. The CMU should thus target a less punitive regulatory treatment for this market segment. [more]
Corporate funding in Germany
Monitor Corporate funding in Germany
Lending to German corporates and self-employed was flat in Q3 2015. Volumes shrank with most manufacturing and services industries, but grew with the agriculture, utilities and trade sectors. Cooperative banks and savings banks expanded their loan book further, while Landesbanks and credit banks lost ground. Financing alternatives were also weak; deposits at the same time grew significantly. The German economy continued its robust expansion in Q3 (GDP +0.3% qoq). Private and public consumption were the only drivers (in addition to inventories), as investments declined and net exports were negative. The outlook for 2016 remains largely unchanged (GDP growth forecast: 1.9%), with private consumption and building investments contributing the most (available only in German). [more]
Talking Point
European banks: Exit the crisis, enter the new normal?
With 2016 just around the corner, the outlook for the European banking sector in the new year looks more promising than it has been for almost a decade. Growth, though meagre, has returned to many business segments and regions. Despite unrelenting pressure on interest margins, total revenues are expanding. Asset quality is improving and profits in 2015 may be the highest since 2007. The biggest questions surround the future path of regulation (where another major round of tightening could paradoxically threaten the recently hard-won stability) and of the European and global economy (which has repeatedly and substantially surprised to the downside in recent years) in 2016. [more]
Global financial markets
Instant revolution of payments? The quest for real-time payments
As digital processes reshape commerce and social life, payment service providers are striving to offer users instruments to transfer funds in a way that matches this immediacy and ubiquity. With the payments market in such a flux, the ECB is pushing banks to provide at least one pan-European instant payment solution in order to prevent a re-fragmentation of the Single Euro Payments Area. However, instant services can be based on different technical set-ups: closed-loop, open-loop and decentralised payment networks. There is an opportunity for new technologies and providers to cater for user needs and win market share. Innovation in instant payments will not alter the economics of payments, though. Positive network externalities and economies of scale in electronic processing will probably lead to a consolidation around a few instant payment systems in the long run. [more]
Spotlight on Germany
 
 
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