Banking, Financial Markets and Regulation
Like the regulatory framework, the structure of the international financial markets influences the development of financial service providers and economies. Scenarios for the future development of the global financial market, and the related opportunities and risks, are a major part of the work of Deutsche Bank Research.
Talking point
European banks: Recovery running out of steam?
The European banking industry has gone into reverse gear this year so far, following substantial progress in 2014 and 2015. Its revenues and profits have relapsed into contraction, and the potential for lower loan loss provisions to come to the rescue seems exhausted. Once more, cost cuts have not kept pace with the retreat on the income side. In a market environment that continues to be very challenging, banks may have to resort to even tougher measures to put themselves on a sustainable footing again. [more]
Talking point
ECB’s corporate bond purchase programme: More distortions
Since the ECB’s announcement to include investment-grade corporate bonds in its QE programme (CSPP), corporate bond issuance has surged in the euro area. However, even though this is a boon for issuers, benefits for the real economy may be quite limited. The value added for SMEs is hard to see, and funds raised will most likely be used predominantly for refinancing of existing debt and for stock buybacks instead of new investments. Moreover, potential side effects of the corporate bond programme such as inefficiencies in the pricing of risks and deterioration in liquidity could increase the distortions in bond markets. [more]
Global financial markets
Free market in death? Europe’s new bail-in regime and its impact on bank funding
With the Single Resolution Mechanism taking full effect in 2016, winding-up large European banks in distress has become a more realistic scenario than ever before. One of the key elements of such a resolution is the bail-in tool. It is supposed to ensure that for investors, higher returns also involve higher risk, thereby establishing greater discipline and differentiation in markets for bank debt. Indeed, our analysis shows that market participants see the new bail-in regime as credible, which is a necessary precondition for a successful application. Important issues that still remain are the market depth for bail-in instruments and legal clarity about bail-in hierarchies. In any case, banks’ funding costs are likely to rise as a result, especially in the medium term. [more]
Corporate funding in Germany
Monitor Corporate funding in Germany
Loan books with German corporates and self-employed remained virtually unchanged in Q2 (+0.1% qoq / +1.6% yoy). Following strong expansion before, lending to the mechanical engineering/car industry fell significantly, in contrast to continuing robust growth in the services sector. Loan volumes rose at most banking groups, but shrank at foreign banks and Landesbanks. Interest rates declined further and deposit rates could well turn negative soon. Leasing reached a new record level, corporate bond volumes were higher, too. The German economy continued its growth trend also in Q2 (GDP +0.4% qoq), though the drivers changed temporarily. Investment fell substantially and private consumption disappointed as well. By contrast, foreign demand delivered a strong result. The GDP growth forecast was raised slightly for 2016 (to 1.9%) and lowered further for 2017, to 1% (available only in German). [more]
Global Financial Markets
Start-ups and their financing in Europe: Out of the woods with Capital Markets Union
Ensuring sufficient funding for European start-ups forms an integral part of the emerging European Capital Markets Union (CMU). Cost-efficient solutions are necessary to reverse the 40% decline in small IPOs in recent years. To strengthen bank lending to start-ups, reviving the securitisation market and potentially establishing an SME-covered bond market is crucial. Venture capital investments are also subdued – most recently, they were only one tenth of the level in the US. To increase them, institutional investors should be granted more flexibility in their portfolio allocations. Finally, the EU hosts more than 500 crowd funding platforms. A common legal and regulatory approach could stir consolidation and thereby reduce search costs for investors and borrowers alike. [more]
Household financial assets in Germany, GDP growth, View from Berlin
German GDP; Fiscal balance; Current account surplus; Retail investors; German industry; View from Berlin
German industry, mortgage lending, German housing and office market, view from Berlin
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