Banking, Financial Markets and Regulation
Like the regulatory framework, the structure of the international financial markets influences the development of financial service providers and economies. Scenarios for the future development of the global financial market, and the related opportunities and risks, are a major part of the work of Deutsche Bank Research.
Talking point
European exchange landscape: too fragmented
In September 2015, the European Commission set out its action plan to establish a Capital Markets Union in order to push for stronger and more integrated capital markets in the EU to better complement bank finance. Creating deeper and more liquid stock markets is crucial in this respect, and also a precondition for European financial centres to regain their position in a global context. Indeed, the total number of stock exchanges operating independently in the EU is astonishingly high, especially in eastern and south-eastern European countries. In addition, market capitalisation is highly concentrated in only a handful of exchanges, and in smaller markets also tends to be lower relative to economic size. [more]
Global financial markets
Free market in death? Europe’s new bail-in regime and its impact on bank funding
With the Single Resolution Mechanism taking full effect in 2016, winding-up large European banks in distress has become a more realistic scenario than ever before. One of the key elements of such a resolution is the bail-in tool. It is supposed to ensure that for investors, higher returns also involve higher risk, thereby establishing greater discipline and differentiation in markets for bank debt. Indeed, our analysis shows that market participants see the new bail-in regime as credible, which is a necessary precondition for a successful application. Important issues that still remain are the market depth for bail-in instruments and legal clarity about bail-in hierarchies. In any case, banks’ funding costs are likely to rise as a result, especially in the medium term. [more]
Global financial markets
Promoting investment and growth: The role of development banks in Europe
The financial and economic crisis brought development banks back in the spotlight. They are seen as part of the economic policy toolkit for overcoming cyclical and structural difficulties in economies, complementing financial systems by improving their functioning and bolstering economic resilience. Interest in development banking to promote growth and boost investment has increased especially in Europe of late. Given the current economic environment and changes in Europe’s banking and financial markets, development banks are bound to continue playing an important role in the coming years. Rather than crisis relief, their focus is shifting (back) to supporting structural change in economies. Here, they can play a useful complementary role, focusing on areas of market failure but risks lie with potential “overburdening” of development banks and setting expectations too high for what they can achieve. [more]
Corporate funding in Germany
Monitor Corporate funding in Germany
Lending to German corporates and self-employed ended 2015 on a high note which pushed growth to 1.4% yoy. Business flourished particularly with the car industry and business-related services, benefiting mainly foreign banks, cooperative banks and savings banks. Loan demand rose thanks to lower interest rates; deposit volumes nonetheless also climbed to a record high. Among the financing alternatives, bond issuance disappointed again. The German economy held its steady growth path in Q4 as well (GDP +0.3% qoq). Lower corporate investments and weaker foreign trade had a negative impact (exports shrank for the first time since 2012). But strong private and public consumption in addition to an increase in building investments prevailed. Neither the drivers nor the speed of GDP growth (1.7% yoy) may change significantly this year (available only in German). [more]
Chart in focus
Talking Point
European banks: The truth is in the numbers – progress in 2015
Despite headwinds from slow economic growth, low interest rates and tighter regulation, European banks’ recovery continues. In 2015, banks’ core business with the private sector returned to growth, revenues rose and provisions for loan losses declined again. The sector has become more profitable and resilient. Challenges remain aplenty, but European banks are definitely heading in the right direction. [more]
Spotlight on Germany
 
 
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