Focus topic Germany

Focus topic: GermanyGermany has recovered well from the global financial and economic crisis. Achieving sustainable growth, however, will require further improvements to the macroeconomic framework. This is a job for policymakers, businesspeople and the public alike. DB Research’s contribution will be to analyse the broad spectrum of issues, discussing possible solutions as well as the economic and political outlook. These range from assessments of economic-policy decisions and analyses of cyclical activity and sector trends right through to the effects of international developments on Germany as a business location.

1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10previous Page - vorherige Seitenext Page - naechste Seite
Date
Title
Size
28.11.2016
Crumbs or pie – how much will Frankfurt's property market benefit from BREXIT?
Abstract: The question regarding the consequences of a Brexit for the EU, the United Kingdom and Germany is expected to remain unanswered for some time. The political uncertainties and exit scenarios range from a contentious separation to a second referendum. At present, however, we can expect that Frankfurt will be one of places to benefit most from a Brexit. In light of the differences between the size of London and Frankfurt, London's crumbs could become Frankfurt's pie. The relocation of jobs to Frankfurt is also likely to boost property demand. The additional demand potential is welcome on the Frankfurt office market because it will equalise structurally induced reductions in the financial sector and will tend to lead to further reductions in vacancies and increase rents. The assumed 5,000 office workers are likely to relocate to the highly priced sub-markets close to the city centre. However, as new building projects also focus on these sub-markets, positive demand effects will be diluted. Because of existing demand overhangs, disadvantages are emerging on the Frankfurt residential property market from a potential relocation of employees. Price growth and the shortage of housing will remain elevated for the foreseeable future. An additional 5,000 homes and a correspondingly elevated housing shortage are likely to drive prices up by more than EUR 100 per m². While purchase prices remain affordable thanks to low interest rates, they are strongly dependent on future interest rate developments.
Topics: Banking; Brexit; Cities; Commercial real estate; European issues; Germany; Global financial markets; Housing policy; Real estate; Residential real estate; Tax policy
load Pdf 696k 
08.11.2016
Logistics: weak environment – no trend reversal in sight
Abstract: Over the next three to five years, global trade is likely to grow only at or around the same pace as global GDP. This structurally weaker momentum will be reflected in slow growth in the global and regional flow of goods, as has already been the case in recent years. In its role as an open, export-oriented economy, Germany – and the German logistics sector in particular – will continue to feel the sting of this development. At a nominal average of 2% a year, turnover growth in the sector is likely to be below the long-term average in the years ahead.
Topics: Economic growth; Economic policy; Germany; Globalisation; Information technology; Intern. relations; Real econ. trends; Sectors / commodities; Services; SMEs; Trade; Transport; Transport policy
load Pdf 1655k 
08.11.2016
Germany needs to do some straight talking with China
Abstract: It was obvious that the Chinese government was not amused when, in light of the ever-expanding list of German technology companies being bought up by Chinese investors, the German Minister of Economic Affairs Sigmar Gabriel spoke of the lack of reciprocation in Chinese investment conditions for German companies. According to press reports, in the first half of this year alone, Chinese companies invested at least EUR 8 billion in German companies.
Topics: Asia; Germany
load Pdf 
28.10.2016
Focus Germany: Subdued industry outlook dampens wage growth
Abstract: German wage growth slowed in H1 2016 and there is a range of factors that are likely to also put a lid on the pick-up in 2017. The impact of labour shortage is limited by material mismatch between the qualifications of the unemployed and those sought by employers as well as substantial immigration flows. High real wage gains have pushed up unit labour costs and weighed on corporate profitability, which is further undermined by low productivity growth. Cautious wage agreements in 2016 on average stipulate only 2% wage increases in 2017. Despite a 4% increase in the statutory minimum wage, aggregate wages should increase by only around 2 ½%. According to our forecasts, next year could see the growth rate for industrial production in Germany drop to 0.5% in real terms. Regarding output in Germany’s large industrial sectors we do not expect major outliers. Also in this issue: “The View from Berlin. All lights on the debates about personalities and tactical gambits.”
Topics: Auto industry; Business cycle; Chemicals industry; Economic growth; Economic policy; Electrical engineering; Exchange rates; Germany; Labour market; Labour market policy; Macroeconomics; Mechanical engineering; Monetary policy; Politics and elections; Prices, inflation; Real econ. trends; Sectors / commodities; Steel industry; Trade
load Pdf 2373k 
04.10.2016
Focus Germany: Difficult times for German savers
Abstract: The policy of low and negative interest rates has had a limited impact on the returns on household financial assets in Germany to date. The nominal total return has averaged 3.4% over the last four years. Even nominal returns on interest-bearing investments did not slip below 2% until 2015 because a large proportion of longer-dated and mostly higher-coupon investments dampened the effect of evaporating market returns. High and stable revaluation gains have also buttressed total returns over recent years. They have probably been enhanced in no small measure by the ECB’s Quantitative Easing programme. Interest income and revaluation effects are likely to be a greater burden in 2016 and 2017. The income return on other assets is also likely to drop on account of the financial market environment. The scope for further significant revaluation gains is likely to be limited given already very high valuations. In 2017 the real total return could even become negative (again).
Topics: Business cycle; Economic growth; Financial market trends; Germany; Key issues - nicht mehr verwenden!; Macroeconomics; Politics and elections; Prices, inflation
load Pdf 2046k 
02.09.2016
Focus Germany: Low returns, political discontent – Germans explore riskier options
Abstract: Against the backdrop of strong Q2 growth and the revision of historic data, we increase our GDP forecast for 2016 to 1.9% (from 1.7%). For 2017 we lower our growth forecast to 1.0% (from 1.3%). Muted wage growth will likely weigh on consumption growth and subdued exports as well as high global uncertainty might negatively impact equipment investments. Further topics in this issue: Fiscal balance, Current account surplus, Retail investors, German industry and View from Berlin.
Topics: Auto industry; Business cycle; Economic growth; Economic policy; Electrical engineering; Food and beverages; Germany; Key issues - nicht mehr verwenden!; Labour market; Macroeconomics; Mechanical engineering; Monetary policy; Other sectors; Politics and elections; Prices, inflation; Real econ. trends; Sectors / commodities
load Pdf 2111k 
29.08.2016
Germany's massive current account surplus set to decline
Abstract: EMU’s current account (CA) surplus has lent some support to the euro over the past two years at a time of relentless fixed income outflows. Germany is pivotal, as it accounts for 60% of the surplus. Since the rotation of fixed income assets out of Europe is likely to continue (‘Euroglut’) the balance of payments should therefore become even more bearish for the euro. The German surplus is likely to weaken by about 20% to 7% of GDP by the end of the decade due to unfavourable demographic trends, the housing boom and slowing globalisation.
Topics: Demographics; Economic growth; Germany; Housing policy; Intern. relations; Key issues - nicht mehr verwenden!; Macroeconomics; Migration; Prices, inflation; Real estate; Residential real estate; Social policy; Trade
load Pdf 2694k 
24.08.2016
German industry: growth in employment likely to end
Abstract: The manufacturing sector is one of Germany's biggest employers. On average, more than 5.2 million people were working in manufacturing in the first half of 2016. This represents an increase of 6.3% compared with the beginning of 2005 – and comes in spite of the deep recession of 2008/2009. In the period under review, job growth was particularly strong in mechanical engineering, the food industry, the rubber and plastics industry, and the metals industry. Expansion of employment in German industry has slowed recently, however. Because of the low rate of global growth and muted investment activity, employment in the industrial sector is likely to stagnate up to 2017 – albeit at a high level.
Topics: Auto industry; Business cycle; Chemicals industry; Economic growth; Electrical engineering; Food and beverages; Germany; Key issues - nicht mehr verwenden!; Labour market; Labour market policy; Macroeconomics; Mechanical engineering; Other sectors; Sectors / commodities; Steel industry
load Pdf 
27.07.2016
Focus Germany: ECB helps industry and boosts property prices
Abstract: There is a high level of excess demand in the housing market and it has grown in recent years. Demand for credit is also growing at a correspondingly rapid pace. The supply of credit could be boosted by further monetary stimulus. In the medium term, more buoyant lending is likely to increase interest rate risk. However, if lending growth remains low, there will be increased risk of overvaluations and a house price bubble. This is particularly true when little new housing is financed and lending is largely for existing property. Given the high level of excess demand in the housing market and the fact that office buildings are being converted to residential buildings, office space is also likely to be in short supply in the coming years. As a result, rents in the office market can be expected to rise more strongly, and could – for a time – outstrip the rise in rents in the housing market. Since Chancellor Merkel assumed office in 2005 her term has been dominated by crisis management, which often required leadership and moderation of differing interests in Europe. Managing the UK’s departure from the EU will have top priority for the time being. Nonetheless, Merkel is likely to focus her attention on domestic topics as much as on European ones in the upcoming months given the looming federal elections in autumn 2017. Also in this issue: Fewer insolvencies in German industry.
Topics: Business cycle; Commercial real estate; Economic growth; Economic policy; Germany; Key issues - nicht mehr verwenden!; Macroeconomics; Monetary policy; Politics and elections; Real estate; Residential real estate
load Pdf 2013k 
21.07.2016
Fewer insolvencies in German industry
Abstract: The 2008/2009 economic and financial crisis caused the number of insolvency proceedings instituted to increase by 48% in 2009 alone. However, the number of insolvencies has been following a downward trend since then. As a result, fewer proceedings were instituted in 2015 than in 2008 across nearly all sectors of industry. The prospects for this trend continuing in 2016 are good. Over the past few years, the number of insolvencies in any given industry has been significantly influenced by the prevailing economic conditions in that industry and – related to this – the value of the euro against the currencies of major trading partners.
Topics: Auto industry; Chemicals industry; Electrical engineering; Food and beverages; Germany; Mechanical engineering; Textiles and clothing industry
load Pdf 
1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10previous Page - vorherige Seitenext Page - naechste Seite
 
 
Brexit
Interactive maps
Copyright © 2016 Deutsche Bank AG, Frankfurt am Main