European Policy Research
In this section you find analyses and commentaries on European (and especially German) economic and fiscal policy. Particular attention is devoted to the institutional development of the EU, above all monetary union, and its individual policy areas.
Talking Point
Migration boom continued in 2014, but calls remain for policy action
Germany was an attractive destination for migrants in 2014 for the fifth year in a row. The net migration balance climbed again by roughly 20% on the year and clearly exceeded the 500,000 mark for the first time since 1992. Roughly 1.4 million persons immigrated to Germany, the second highest total in the last 65 years (1992: 1.5 million). Since the beginning of the sovereign debt crisis in the eurozone in 2010 a net 1.7 million persons have migrated to Germany, so despite a shrinking domestic population the total population has expanded by approximately half a million. [more]
Chart in focus
In focus
Refugee crisis update: EU-Turkey Agreement teeters on the brink
Due to several factors, including the EU-Turkey Agreement, the influx of refugees to Europe has markedly decreased in recent months. However, the EU-Turkey Agreement seems to be teetering on the brink. With regard to the travel liberalisation for Turkish nationals, there is a deadlock. Among the 72 preconditions for the liberalisation, the reform of the Turkish anti-terror legislation in particular is much debated. The European Parliament is emphasizing the request for such a reform, while the Turkish government has stated that it will not alter the legislation. [more]
EU Monitor
Free market in death? Europe’s new bail-in regime and its impact on bank funding
With the Single Resolution Mechanism taking full effect in 2016, winding-up large European banks in distress has become a more realistic scenario than ever before. One of the key elements of such a resolution is the bail-in tool. It is supposed to ensure that for investors, higher returns also involve higher risk, thereby establishing greater discipline and differentiation in markets for bank debt. Indeed, our analysis shows that market participants see the new bail-in regime as credible, which is a necessary precondition for a successful application. Important issues that still remain are the market depth for bail-in instruments and legal clarity about bail-in hierarchies. In any case, banks’ funding costs are likely to rise as a result, especially in the medium term. [more]
Research Briefing
Ending China’s differential treatment: What’s at stake for EU trade defence?
When China joined the WTO in 2001, its accession protocol included an option for members to apply alternative methodologies when assessing dumping for Chinese imports. As parts of the provisions are set to expire in December 2016, the future approach to determine dumping in investigations concerning China in the EU has come under debate. There are several options on the table: They range from sticking to the status quo to allowing for full market economy treatment. The outcome matters for both European and Chinese industries and could have potential ramifications on China-EU trade relations. The European Commission therefore has to walk a tightrope taking into account the concerns of the different market participants affected as well as member states, which have often held divergent positions on anti-dumping in the past. [more]
Spotlight on Germany
 
 
Publications
Articles on economic policy appear in the following periodicals: 
SMEs
Dataflash Eurozone
    European elections 2014
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