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    21st century reserve currencies - (how long) will the dollar-euro dominance prevail?overlay
    November 15, 2017
    Talking Point
    The euro’s second place among the world’s most important reserve currencies has remained so far undisputed. The single currency’s share of allocated foreign exchange reserves stabilised at 19.9% in Q2, according to IMF data. The US dollar easily defended its position as the dominant currency in the international monetary system. But both the euro and the dollar gradually gave some way to other reserve currencies. Regardless of whether this observation reflects structural developments or rather (temporary) shifts in reserve allocation - it certainly fuels the discussion about the 21st century’s leading reserve currency (or currencies).
    Robo-advice - a true innovation in asset managementoverlay
    August 10, 2017
    EU Monitor
    Robo-advisors are online investment platforms that use computer algorithms to manage client portfolios and are thus part of the FinTech universe. With their user-friendly, automated and low-cost services, robo-advisors pose a challenge to traditional financial advisory services and are growing fast. Online client onboarding is the most crucial step in this process, relying on questionnaires to figure out clients' preferences. Following a conservative approach in their asset selection, robo-advisors mainly invest in ETFs. Portfolio allocation is done via mean-variance optimisation and threshold-based rebalancing is utilised to maintain targeted asset weights. Wealthier and more educated clients are joining millennials as robo-advisory clients. Fees are considerably higher in the EU than in the US where robo-advisors’ AuM are much larger. Robo-advisors can contribute to financial inclusion, while their long-term success relies on a high degree of accuracy and suitability for clients.
    Video: Cash, freedom and crimeoverlay
    June 22, 2017
    Videos
    With the growing use of digital payments, the need for physical cash is no longer self-evident. But: Demand for euro cash is on the rise. Euro cash in circulation tripled between 2003 and 2016 to EUR 1.2 trillion and thus, grew faster than GDP at current prices. It is estimated that euro cash is used for domestic payments, hoarded for saving purposes and held outside the euro area at roughly equal parts.
    Europe
    European integration and the role of the ESMoverlay
    November 3, 2017
    Focus Europe
    On 15 December EU leaders will discuss integration. One proposal that is mentioned in the debates in France and Germany is a repurposing of the ESM as a “European Monetary Fund”. Using a Q&A format, we consider what reforms might mean for the euro area bailout fund.
    New EU money market fund regulation: Will growth continue?overlay
    September 13, 2017
    EU Monitor
    Money market funds in the euro area managed assets worth EUR 1.16 trillion in mid-2017. Low interest rates did not hamper the impressive growth by EUR 260 billion during the past three years. But new EU regulation taking effect in 2018 will impose stricter rules on fund managers. However, the measured regulation will probably not cause a major restructuring of the euro area market, in contrast to the reshuffling seen in response to the US money market fund reform. In the future, Brexit could lead to competition for non-EUR denominated money market fund business between the EU and the UK.
    EU Politics: Reform debate to pick up pace after the German electionsoverlay
    September 4, 2017
    Focus Europe
    Optimism about Europe’s future surged after the French elections, while the EU is increasingly losing patience with British “divorce tactics”. Franco-German initiatives will be key to set the path for European reforms but the debate is expected to only gain speed after the formation of a new German government towards the end of the year. Meanwhile, the refugee challenge and EU external relations will remain on top of Europe’s political agenda.
    Germany
    German labour market policy: Much remains to be done!overlay
    November 13, 2017
    Germany Monitor
    Employment in Germany has been rising for years now. However, cyclical tailwinds increasingly hide structural problems, such as tighter regulation and demographic developments. If the labour market is not to become a major obstacle to German growth, the future government will need to take quick and decisive action to counteract existing and imminent imbalances on this key market. Reducing long-term unemployment will require a mix of policy measures. The total number of jobs would probably be significantly lower, if there was no low-wage sector. Integrating refugees and the “mismatch” between the qualifications desired by employers and the qualifications which unemployed people actually possess are major challenges. Which direction is the new German government going to take in labour market policy?
    Economic backdrop supportive for Jamaica talksoverlay
    November 3, 2017
    Focus Germany
    Envisaged Jamaica coalition: After the exploratory talks is before the negotiations. It would not come as a surprise, if the coalition formation were to take longer than ever before in the Federal Republic and if the chancellor were not until January. Given that in many areas critical details remained unresolved in the first round of the exploratory talks, further challenging rounds will follow in the next few weeks. Only after that will the official coalition talks begin - provided the Greens sound the all-clear at their party convention. The search for compromises is aggravated, as many of the partners’ requests have to remain unfulfilled despite buoyant tax revenues. Initially, i.e. in 2018, the economic impulse of a "black-yellow-green" fiscal policy is likely to be very limited. But steps in the right direction of strengthening Germany are on the horizon. Another positive is the clear commitment to a united and strong Europe. (Also included in this issue: November tax estimate, German current account surplus, trends in the EU industry)
    Jamaica coalition unlikely to offer a goody bagoverlay
    October 6, 2017
    Focus Germany
    The view from Berlin: Jamaica unlikely to trigger fundamental policy changes. The total additional fiscal impulse provided by a Jamaica coalition could in our view amount to between EUR 15 bn and EUR 20 bn in 2018. This would be only marginally more than the EUR 15 bn tax cuts "promised" by the outgoing Minister of Finance, which we had already taken into account in our 1.8% GDP forecast for 2018. Proposals in the FDP's election platform to scale back the ESM and to install an orderly EMU exit procedure have raised concerns among some EU politicians. We doubt that these two proposals will make it into the coalition treaty. Despite the FDP's insistence on more market- and rule-based procedure within EMU, it is very unlikely that Germany would not provide the necessary support if another EMU country slipped into acute crisis. (Also included in this issue: Public finances after the election, World trade)
    Thematic
    Beacon of stability: The foundations of Germany’s successoverlay
    December 15, 2016
    dbStandpunkt (Engl.)
    Germany remains an anchor of steadiness with an undisputed role as leader in Europe and is the only country that comes close to being on a par with America. This story of success is based on many structural factors, some of which complement and mutually reinforce each other. We group them as follows: (1) Macropolicies focused on stability and growth (2) Institutions grounded in German ‘ordoliberalism’ (3) Global companies with unique structures (4) An equitable system of social security and cooperative social partners (5) A long-term perspective by companies and citizens with the willingness to forgo immediate reward – in our view the most important factor in the success. The combination of innovative, multinational companies, functioning institutions and highly skilled workers will, in our view, maintain Germany’s competitiveness and prosperity into the future. German politicians are therefore confronted with the increasing challenge of holding the eurozone together. However, if anti-euro movements gain the upper hand in key partner countries, thereby increasing the disruptive risks, there may be a reassessment in Germany of the euro’s costs and benefits.
    The dark sides of QE: Backdoor socialisation, expropriated savers and asset bubblesoverlay
    November 1, 2016
    dbStandpunkt (Engl.)
    While European central bankers commend themselves for the scale and originality of monetary policy since 2012, this self-praise is increasingly unwarranted. The reality is that since Mr Draghi’s infamous “whatever it takes” speech in 2012, the eurozone has delivered barely any growth, the worst labour market performance among industrial countries, unsustainable debt levels, and inflation far below the central bank’s own target. While the positive case for European Central Bank intervention is weak at best, the negative repercussions are becoming overwhelming. This paper outlines the five darker sides to current monetary policy.
    A darker Europeoverlay
    June 23, 2016
    dbStandpunkt (Engl.)
    What this victory for the Leave campaign ends up meaning for the future of Britain is debatable. What is not in doubt is that Europe without its brightest star will be a darker place. Adding to the gloom is the fact this was avoidable. Britain voting to go it alone mirrors a wider distrust in the European project – a manifestation of its weak economic situation.
    The House View
    The House View: Back to schooloverlay
    September 18, 2017
    The House View
    Unlike the last few years, this summer was relatively quiet. As markets look ahead to the rest of the year, the key theme will continue to be the major central banks’ tentative progress toward removing monetary accommodation. Investors have so far not priced in this outlook. Since the prospects for growth across all the major countries is better than it has been for some time it remains a puzzle why there hasn't been a greater sell-off in bond markets.
    The House View : Taking a step backoverlay
    July 25, 2017
    The House View
    As markets enter into the summer lull, it is useful to take a step back. The global economy is in better shape than it has been in several years. This has allowed other central banks to follow the Fed and gradually start their exit journey, a process that is a historic challenge given the unprecedented level of monetary accommodation. But with inflation still below target, a key part of the normalisation puzzle is still missing.<br/>Although labour market tightness has not yet fed to wages, and hence to inflation, we expect it will. Core inflation should move higher over the medium-term in the US and Europe, supporting further monetary tightening and a normalisation of yield curves. While no policy change is expected by the Fed on 26-July, an announcement to begin phasing out its balance sheet reinvestment is likely in September and we expect another rate hike in December. As for the ECB, rate hikes are still far off, and we expect the central bank to announce another QE extension and tapering in October.<br/>Our global macro outlook is little changed this year. We expect growth to rebound from the slowest pace post-crisis in 2016, though relative to consensus we are more positive on the US and more bearish on Japan. In China, we continue to expect a gradual deceleration, but see upside risks to growth in the second half of the year.<br/>We are generally constructive on risk assets, expecting material upside to US equities in the next 18 months and positive but more balanced performance in EM. There are signs the dollar has peaked, but we do not expect a material devaluation yet. We are more positive on the euro, seeing upside versus the dollar and sterling. We expect yield curves to normalise gradually, but there is risk of a more sudden upward shift, depending on the path of core inflation.<br/>David Folkerts-Landau, Group Chief Economist<br/>Key pages this month:<br/>P6 Global economy in a better place<br/>P8 Central banks overview<br/>P11 Current low inflation regime vs. 1960s and 1980s<br/>P17 Signs of dollar top<br/>You can access a two-page update of Deutsche Bank Research's views on global macro, monetary policy and markets, as well as some of the key themes driving them, at any time by downloading The House View Snapshot from: houseview.research.db.com.
    The House View : Mixed signalsoverlay
    June 28, 2017
    The House View
    Global investors have recently been forced to sift through mixed signals from macro data and markets. Chief among these discordant messages is the apparent dichotomy between softer inflation, lower yields and flatter curves, and falling oil prices on the one hand, and still solid global growth and firm risk sentiment on the other hand.<br/>We remain generally optimistic in our global macro outlook despite these mixed signals. Supply-side factors, rather than a weaker demand outlook, underpin the fall in oil prices, and this is positive for growth for oil importers. The softening core inflation trend is due primarily to temporary factors, particularly in the US, and the uptrend should resume given the solid growth momentum.Indeed, our global growth outlook is little changed since the start of the year. We marked down US growth on lower odds of Trump’s policy agenda, but still expect deregulation and modest fiscal stimulus to support above-trend growth. This downgrade is compensated by upgrades to eurozone and China growth.<br/>Our market views largely reflect this overall constructive tone: we are not concerned about the discordance between firming risk assets and falling rates; the normalisation of US and Europe rates should resume in coming months. In FX we have turned more positive on the euro but stay bearish sterling.<br/>Our base case that political risk would not escalate is playing out. Moreover, the intervention to resolve ailing banks in Veneto is positive and lowers risk in Italy. The exception, as expected, is the UK, where the outcome of Brexit has become more binary: the risk of a soft Brexit has risen, but so has that of a crash Brexit.<br/>David Folkerts-Landau, Group Chief Economist<br/>Key pages this month:<br/>P6 Mixed signals<br/>P8 Oil less a concern for risk assets<br/>P11 Flat US yield curve but low risk of recession<br/>P17 Europe political risk not materialising<br/>P23 Limited scope for further oil weaknessYou can access a two-page update of Deutsche Bank Research's views on g
    Konzept
    Can markets withstand the removal of QE?overlay
    October 2, 2017
    Konzept (Engl.)
    Welcome to the eleventh edition of Konzept, Deutsche Bank’s flagship research magazine, which coincides with memories of the first stirrings of the financial crisis entering their eleventh year. This issue is published as the Federal Reserve starts rolling back quantitative easing, symbolising the post-crisis era giving way to the post-QE world. <br/>The withdrawal of QE, however, causes anxiety among investors. After all, central bank balance sheets and asset prices have climbed hand-in-hand since the crisis. Does the planned descent of the former necessarily lead to the latter following suit? All three features in this Konzept are devoted to testing this hypothesis.<br/>
    DeCAF – how to invest in a post-carbon worldoverlay
    March 30, 2017
    Konzept (Engl.)
    Decarbonisation initiatives to halve global emissions will dictate how much certain industries can produce over the coming decades. DeCAF – Deutsche Bank’s Carbon Alignment Framework – is a new investment approach which recognises that the volume goals of policymakers and value goals of investors are not necessarily aligned.
    The case against US infrastrucutre mega-spendingoverlay
    October 22, 2016
    Konzept (Engl.)
    There is consensus among economists, politicians and commentators that America needs a massive infrastructure investment programme – even the two presidential candidates agree. In the name of<br/>balance, our lead feature sets out the counter argument.
    Introducing the new DB Research
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