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Jan Schildbach

Analyst, Team Head
Banking, Financial Markets, Regulation

Topics:
Banking, Financial Markets and Regulation

Address:
Mainzer Landstraße 11-17
60329 Frankfurt
Germany

Contact:
Deutsche Bank Research

More documents written by Jan Schildbach

81 (61-72)
February 28, 2013
Region:
61
Since 1997, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Germany have raised their average equity ratio substantially from 6% to 22%, not least as a reaction to more stringent lending requirements by banks. At the same time, SMEs’ dependence on bank loans declined
whose share in total assets dropped to just 26% from 37%.
Large differences remain between private and public firms. [more]
November 20, 2012
Region:
62
The political dynamics in Europe have shifted against universal banks in recent months. This is a dangerous development that threatens the key role such banks play in modern economies and risks eliminating many of the advantages universal banks have to offer: in a “one-stop shop”, they provide their customers with a broad range of tailor-made services, higher volumes of credit and lower funding costs than narrower “specialist banks”. In addition, thanks to the diversification of their operations and the potential to leverage revenue and cost synergies, universal banks tend to be more stable than specialist banks. They also provide for diversity in bank business models and are better positioned to monitor the financial health of specific clients as well as to spot unsustainable risk accumulation across financial markets. [more]
May 2, 2012
Region:
67
Deposits are the most important source of funding for European banks, providing about 60% of the total. At the same time, private-sector deposits tend to be less volatile than other funding instruments. The importance of deposits is set to increase even further in the medium term because of new regulatory requirements and higher levels of risk aversion at banks. Boosting deposit volumes could enable moderate growth in bank assets and thus also an increase in lending to the private sector over the coming years. However, this would require that households hold a larger share of their savings in the form of deposits and invest a smaller proportion in insurance policies. [more]
April 5, 2012
Region:
68
For the first time in at least a decade, all major revenue components at the 20 largest European banks declined simultaneously. Apart from trading income (-24%), the decrease was modest (interest income -0.5%, fees & commissions -1%) yet the looming challenge for banks’ business models has finally become crystal clear: there is no obvious driver for future growth. [more]
June 9, 2011
71
The financial crisis dealt international banking a serious blow. This paper reviews 1) the extent to which financial markets have become global in recent years as well as the damage inflicted on cross-border linkages by the financial crisis, 2) the reasons for the internationalisation process and 3) prospects for international banking in the “new-normal” environment. Apart from market developments, this reflects a new focus in the political and regulatory debate aimed at increasing the – mostly domestic – grip on the banking industry. [more]
November 25, 2010
Region:
72
The reasons for the current problems of some euro-area sovereigns on the capital markets differ from country to country. In the case of Greece, it was mainly a persistently unsound fiscal policy that led to a loss of confidence among investors, while in Ireland this was primarily due to a credit bubble which had inflated the size of the financial sector. [more]
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