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Carbon tax: Better than the status quo, but not the optimal solution

May 15, 2019
Region:
Analyst:
For both environmental and economic reasons, a carbon tax would be superior to the current patchwork of subsidies and regulatory law (standards, bans, caps, quotas etc.) which characterises climate policy. However, the tax has a key disadvantage: while it sets a price for carbon emissions, it does not set a cap. That is why emissions trading is even superior to a carbon tax. Despite the convincing advantages of market-based in-struments, a fundamental re-orientation of German and European climate policy unfortunately appears unlikely. Instead, existing instruments will probably be adapted again and again once their negative side effects become too obvious. This will make climate policy less efficient than it could be and more expensive than necessary. [more]

More documents contained in "Talking Point"

124 (109-120)
November 11, 2013
Analyst:
109
Among the agreed derivatives market reforms, the central clearing of OTC derivatives contracts has a pivotal role that changes the existing risk management and collateralisation practices tremendously. Nevertheless, to date, there is little empirical evidence on the impact of the new market infrastructure on CDS spreads. Controlling for a number of factors, our results indicate that the costs of central clearing seem to be passed on to end-users in the form of increased CDS spreads. [more]
October 14, 2013
110
The East African country has been experiencing impressive economic growth: double-digit between 2004 and 2010, it has averaged 8.7% annually over the past five years thanks to the expansion of agriculture and services. Ethiopia has thus been the fastest-growing economy in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Projected at 6.5% annually over the next five years, it is set to remain on a robust growth path. [more]
June 13, 2013
111
The former Portuguese colony has developed from an agriculture-based economy into one of Sub-Saharan Africa’s main oil and mineral producers and its third largest economy, with strong growth potential. Relative political stability after a 27-year civil war ending in 2002, high foreign investment (current FDI inflows are estimated at USD 15 bn) and strong government spending have propelled Angola onto a robust growth path: annual real GDP growth has averaged 11% over the past decade, it is estimated at over 8% in 2012 and around 7% in upcoming years. The government has embarked on a series of reforms towards economic diversification and more inclusive growth [more]
November 30, 2011
Region:
116
Migration can be an effective way of reducing geographical imbalances on the labour markets. Together with politicians and the larger society, companies have a key role to play in integrating migrant workers. It is also in the interest of companies to make good use of the international pool of qualified labor. With 20% of the population being either immigrants themselves (10%) or second-generation immigrants (another 10% according to the EU Commission) – both in Germany and France – the costs of not fully integrating this potential are high, both for business and society. [more]
July 11, 2011
118
State-led economic development, if successfully implemented, is appropriate during the early “catch up” phase of economic growth. However, as growth becomes more dependent on indigenous innovation and hence a dynamic private sector, a shift to more market-led rather than state-directed development becomes necessary. This also applies to the banking sector. Subject to proper regulation, banking systems that rely on private-sector banks and market-led credit allocation will eventually tend to generate superior economic outcomes. That said, we are unlikely to see a significant reduction in public-sector bank ownership in the BRIC countries anytime soon, nor, for that matter, a tangible increase in foreign ownership. [more]
November 25, 2010
Region:
119
The reasons for the current problems of some euro-area sovereigns on the capital markets differ from country to country. In the case of Greece, it was mainly a persistently unsound fiscal policy that led to a loss of confidence among investors, while in Ireland this was primarily due to a credit bubble which had inflated the size of the financial sector. [more]
February 12, 2010
120
Well aware that small farmers are key to world food security, agribusiness players are increasingly partnering with them. They are taking practical steps to secure farmers’ financial success in a sustainable way and integrate them into the global food supply chains... [more]
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