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Where are food prices heading?

March 10, 2011
Food prices are reaching record highs, which raises concerns about spending capacity, hunger, political turmoil and global growth. The current surge in food prices is due to the combination of short-term supply shocks and longer-term structural factors leading to a tight demand-supply balance. In this paper we review the main considerations regarding food price movements and include a discussion on the impact of speculation. [more]

More documents from Claire Schaffnit-Chatterjee

20 (13-20)
September 17, 2010
Region:
13
The responsibility to manage volatility in agriculture is increasingly in farmers’ hands and they will need to rely more heavily on market-based tools. All in all, public policy could be most useful in increasing the risk management ability of farmers. Any extension of the public safety net will reduce the incentives for farmers and other agents along the food supply chain to manage their risks effectively through derivatives, private insurance or on-farm strategies like production diversification. Policies need to empower farmers to take their own risk management decisions and to have access to a diversity of instruments and strategies. More direct interventions are likely better kept as a means of last resort and restricted to measures which do not act at the expense of the rest of the world or of environmental sustainability. [more]
February 12, 2010
14
Well aware that small farmers are key to world food security, agribusiness players are increasingly partnering with them. They are taking practical steps to secure farmers’ financial success in a sustainable way and integrate them into the global food supply chains... [more]
September 21, 2009
15
Production, distribution and access to food are being redefined by new and ongoing forces. Increased scarcity of natural resources, growing demand for food, changing nature of consumption and climate change are posing serious challenges to ensuring food security for the next decades. Still, we believe that the 9 billion of us in 2050 can be fed provided that we make the right decisions. Cross-sectoral innovation is essential, as well as changes to the current systems for producing, distributing and consuming food. Reforms are also crucial in the areas of agricultural support, food aid, trade liberalisation, support regimes for biofuels and intellectual property rights. [more]
September 18, 2008
18
The new figures are out. German women still earned 24% less per hour than men in 2006. This unadjusted gender wage gap is a useful indicator and underlines the need for action – especially since it has not decreased significantly in recent years, in spite of women’s increasing education levels. However, this overall indicator has the limitations of all aggregated averages, in that it mixes aspects of a different nature. In particular, it is important to distinguish between potential discrimination (arising in the absence of equal pay for equal work) and “choices”, like career patterns, for instance. At the same time, the latter are only partly driven by preferences – which makes things even more complex. We see four major aspects of the gender wage gap, three pertaining to women at large, and one specific to mothers (and a few rare fathers)... [more]
May 19, 2008
Region:
19
Female and male participation in most walks of life are unequal today, either due to lack of opportunity or by choice. Along which dimensions are changes likely in Germany by 2020? Looking forward, we need to find some answers, in order to make the right decisions. We therefore examine the interactions between women and future structural changes, such as population ageing, a growing project economy, increasing knowledge intensity and fast-spreading virtual connectedness. We develop a plausible future, for women, and shaped by women, and pinpoint implications for government and corporations. [more]
March 27, 2007
Region:
20
Ageing does not directly impact the total shares of expenditures at the country level, although it will drastically affect the nature of demand within most consumption segments. In fact, economic growth is the main driver of change in the consumption structure, through rising levels of expenditures and shifts in relative prices. (Ageing is indirectly at play here through its effect on income distribution). Another important driver is societal transformation. Our projections show that, when all three drivers are factored in, transport, housing, health care and entertainment take larger expenditure shares at the expense of food.
The main household expenses will remain housing, transport, entertainment, and - still - food. [more]
22.2.0