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April 27, 2022
We are undergoing a paradigm shift in macroeconomics. Consensus forecasts have been consistently wrong over the last decade, and over the last couple of years alone they underestimated the scale of the pandemic rebound, the inflationary impact of the stimulus packages, and the fact they weren’t transitory. [more]
April 22, 2022
The storm clouds over the global economy have darkened dramatically. Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has led to fundamental questions about Europe’s dependence on Russian energy and the continent’s geopolitical stability. It has also significantly pushed up commodity prices, exacerbating above-target inflation, and creating a serious risk that longer-term expectations become unanchored. [more]
April 7, 2022
Next in our series of concise interviews ‘Q&A with...’ we talk to the Telecommunications Services team. They share their insights into whether European ‘telcos’ should do better with rising interest rates, how they fare in times of heightened geopolitical risks and if the sector can do better in its own right rather than as a defensive. [more]
April 1, 2022
Analyst:
In the next in our series of concise interviews ‘Q&A with...’ we talk to Rob Sanders, Head of European Technology Hardware Research. Rob shares his insights into when he believes chip shortages might end and how rising input prices are affecting the semiconductor sector. [more]
March 25, 2022
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Analyst:
In 2021, stablecoins’ market capitalization increased multifold to USD 170 bn. More importantly, they are the most traded coins in the entire crypto space and crucial for decentralized finance (DeFi). In the future, stablecoins could also gain traction in the real world – adding to the competition in the fields of retail and corporate payments. Stablecoins differ considerably in their price stabilization mechanisms and can pose risks, which have come into the spotlight of regulators. [more]
March 25, 2022
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Analyst:
Despite many years of expansion of renewable energies, Germany is – as most other industrialised countries in the world are – still dependent on fossil fuels. Germany imports close to 70% of its energy resources with Russia currently the most important supplier of fossil fuels. Germany aims to reduce its dependency on energy imports from Russia as fast as possible and plans to massively expand renewable energies but will also invest in LNG infrastructure to diversify gas supply. The short-term risk of being cut off from Russian gas and oil supply is more pronounced in the heating market and less severe in the electricity sector. A faster expansion of renewables is a consequence of the current energy crisis, but no short-term solution given limitations on the supply side. [more]
March 4, 2022
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War in Ukraine – slowing but not ending the German recovery. In a moderate economic scenario (which is our new baseline forecast) we expect German GDP to grow by between 2 ½% and 3% (old forecast 4%). Surging energy prices should push the annual inflation rate to around 5 ½% in 2022. Government spending is expected to be ramped up by 1 ¼ and 1 ½ pp, limiting the overall growth loss. In a more severe scenario headline inflation could rise to between 6 ½% and 7%, as oil and gas deliveries are at least temporarily halted. Annual GDP growth should be a meagre 1% to 1 ½%. [more]
January 26, 2022
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Due to significant demand/supply imbalances as well as climate policy measures, energy prices were the main driver of consumer price inflation in Germany in 2021. In 2022 as a whole, prices might increase by more than 20% for gas on average and by more than 15% for electricity. In that case, higher gas and electricity prices would substantially boost Germany’s inflation rate in 2022 (by up to 1 percentage point). In the medium term, a more ambitious climate and energy policy will very likely continue to raise consumer price inflation. At least over the transition period, rising CO2 prices (via the national carbon levy or the EU-wide emissions trading system) will not only lead to a permanently higher price trend for fossil fuels (oil/gas heating, fuels) but also costs for electricity generation. Overall, this weakens the widespread argument to view energy price increases as temporary. [more]
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